Religion

The Evolution Of Science In The Classroom

It has been decided to make teaching of the evolutionary theory compulsory in primary schools through the UK.  It is a move that has...

Absolve This: Put The Catholic Church Out Of Its Misery

Bless you Father for you have sinned... I've made no secrets of my feelings towards the Catholic Church, in particular when it comes to its...

On Palin, cannibalism and creationism.

I deliberately avoid being preachy about vegetarianism but occasionally there comes an opportunity where comment is really deserved. In an almost deliberately controversial tone which...

No Evidence Allowed: The Government on Pseudoscience & Homeopathy

As recently mentioned, the firing of Professor David Nutt has brought into focus politics' deep seated discomfort with scientific evidence. In a world where...

The Homo’s Made Us Do It

I think I can honestly say I've never been rendered speechless with anger before. However thanks to a one page document recently released by...

The Open Habitat Project

Background information As part of the development of our internet presence The Skeptic Magazine is collaborating with the Open Habitat Project in...

Inside a Camphill Community


Volume 20 Number 4, Winter 2007


Matthew Provonsha reports on his disillusionment with life in a religious commune

LAST YEAR I spent two months inside a Camphill Community along with other volunteers of various ages from around the world, eager to help others and better myself. I was drawn to communal life, but more importantly I was put off by the society in which I grew up. As a teenage atheist and leftist in the United States I was appalled by the vast increase of religious fervor in public life and by our startling move to the Far Right even during my lifetime. Like so many Americans I was laden with a painful sense of hopelessness. I could only watch television, drink or get high to distract myself. Retreat in one form or another seemed to be the only suitable option.
I was quite enamored with British culture, as well, and wanted nothing more than to see the land which had produced so many of my favorite authors, comedians, rock stars and TV shows. The UK almost seemed (to my naïve self ) to be a totally different, more civilized world. So it was that I decided to find someplace in Britain where I could work for food and lodging. In truth I only chose to ‘volunteer’ at the Mount Camphill Community, a school for young adults with special needs in the South-East of England, because it offered the best benefits. In addition to organic food and lovely surroundings it offers a weekly stipend of fifty pounds, weekend outings and ample time off.

Believe it or not

Sally Marlow interviews Mark Vernon about life, the universe and everything – but mainly agnosticism.

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